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orion

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NASA's Kepler mission is scheduled to launch on March 5.  The goal of this mission is to identify earth-size terrestrial planets in habitable zone around sun-like stars in a group of about 100,000 stars.  It will be interesting to see what it finds.  Because it uses the transit method of detection, Kepler will only be able to detect fluctuations in a star's brightness for planets passing in front of the star from Kepler's viewpoint.  

Kepler Mission

Another step towards eventually finding life on another world.  
 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 1:50 PM on February 26, 2009 | IP
Apoapsis

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24 hour countdown:
Spacecraft: Kepler
Launch Vehicle: United Launch Alliance Delta II 7925
Launch Location: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station
Launch Pad: Launch Complex 17-B
Launch Date: March 6
Launch Time: 10:49:57 p.m. EST



-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 11:01 PM on March 5, 2009 | IP
wisp

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Does anyone know the official position of Creationism regarding life in other worlds?

They say their science is capable of predicting stuff... What would it predict about that?



-------
Quote from Lester10 at 2:51 PM on September 21, 2010 in the thread
Scientists assert (by Lester):

Ha Ha. (...) I've told you people endlessly about my evidence but you don't want to show me yours - you just assert.
porkchop
Would we see a mammal by the water's edge "suddenly" start breathing underwater(w/camera effect of course)?
Contact me at youdebate.1wr@gishpuppy.com
 


Posts: 3037 | Posted: 05:46 AM on March 6, 2009 | IP
Apoapsis

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I don't think there is such a thing as an "official" position, that would indicate there is a common unifying set of standards.

But I've seen every position stated from that "the existence of planets around other stars would destroy my faith" to "life on other worlds would make no difference".

Edit to clarify first quote.

(Edited by Apoapsis 3/6/2009 at 9:21 PM).


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 8:50 PM on March 6, 2009 | IP
wisp

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That's what i've thought...

I mean, if knowing that the Moon is not a 'lesser light' makes no difference to you, nothing will. Or nothing has to, unless you want to.



-------
Quote from Lester10 at 2:51 PM on September 21, 2010 in the thread
Scientists assert (by Lester):

Ha Ha. (...) I've told you people endlessly about my evidence but you don't want to show me yours - you just assert.
porkchop
Would we see a mammal by the water's edge "suddenly" start breathing underwater(w/camera effect of course)?
Contact me at youdebate.1wr@gishpuppy.com
 


Posts: 3037 | Posted: 9:18 PM on March 6, 2009 | IP
Apoapsis

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Liftoff looked good.  Too early to call it a successful launch, but so far so good.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 11:14 PM on March 6, 2009 | IP
Apoapsis

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Third stage sep, the spacecraft is on it's own.  There's only one major deployment, the telescope cover.  Normally this would be done after waiting a period time for contaminants on the spacecraft to evaporate.  I don't know what the mission timeline looks like.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 12:09 AM on March 7, 2009 | IP
orion

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Apoapsis - that's good news.  I read that the spacecraft will be in an earth trailing orbit around the sun.  There is a 2-month commissioning period before it is put to work.

Kepler mission
 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 12:28 AM on March 7, 2009 | IP
Apoapsis

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OK, found a timeline, cover eject is launch plus 19 days.

Another interesting tidbit is that they're using Ka band downlink, and they can hold almost 60 days of data between tracks.  Tracking is a big cost driver, they've done a good job of minimizing ground contact time requirements.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 09:05 AM on March 7, 2009 | IP
Apoapsis

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First science data is on the ground, the spacecraft went into safing so the downlink occurred a few days early.

On June 15, 2009, Kepler entered safe mode, a protocol executed by the spacecraft as a precautionary safety feature. In this case, the safe mode entry was caused by a fault in part of the spacecraft processor. Upon detection of the entry into safe mode, engineers began anomaly response procedures to determine spacecraft health and status, cause of the fault, and recovery. Engineers determined the spacecraft's stored science data was safe. The fault caused the Kepler photometer to turn off. Further analysis indicated the Kepler subsystems were not endangered by the fault. Engineers re-initialized the photometer, downlinked the science data, performed the quarterly roll, and returned the spacecraft to its mission. Analysis will continue on spacecraft telemetry files to better understand the root cause of the safe-mode event. The mission baseline allows for 12 days per year for potential safe-mode events such as this one. This particular event consumed about one-and-a-half days of what would have been time collecting science data. In mission dress rehearsals prior to launch, the Kepler team practiced responses to non-nominal conditions, like safe-mode events and spacecraft malfunctions. Thanks to this practice, the team responded effectively and efficiently to restore Kepler to its nominal operational status. Twice-per-week routine contacts with the Kepler spacecraft will resume, as Kepler collects another 30 days of science data in its hunt for Earth-like planets. The next science data download will occur in late July.
Kepler update


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 10:28 PM on July 1, 2009 | IP
Fencer27

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Thanks for the update, once school was out I haven't heard anything about the Kepler project. It is good to hear that everything is going well so far. Although I have my doubts that it will find anything too interesting, it is fascinating!


-------
"So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets." - Jesus (Matthew 7:12)
 


Posts: 551 | Posted: 03:51 AM on July 2, 2009 | IP
Apoapsis

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On PBS Nova Science Now, right now.  9pm Eastern.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 9:05 PM on July 7, 2009 | IP
Apoapsis

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Nice and simple demonstration of the experiment.  Not much left but the wait for results.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 12:22 AM on July 8, 2009 | IP
orion

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Kepler just finished some inital tests, which idicate it should perform as expected.  It will be very interesting to see what it finds once it begins operations in earnest.

From here:
Kepler Should be able to find Earth-like planets
 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 1:49 PM on August 7, 2009 | IP
Apoapsis

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Quote from orion at 1:49 PM on August 7, 2009 :
Kepler just finished some inital tests, which idicate it should perform as expected.  It will be very interesting to see what it finds once it begins operations in earnest.

From here:
Kepler Should be able to find Earth-like planets





Really nice phase curve for a short period "hot Jupiter".  Earth sized planets are supposed to be well within the dynamic range.

Been out of town for a while.   A very close friend passed away suddenly and I've been helping out the wife and childern, dealing with arrangements, insurance, and social security.  The world is missing a brilliant scientist.

Looks like some new faces around here.

(Edited by Apoapsis 1/8/2013 at 06:35 AM).


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 9:48 PM on August 12, 2009 | IP
orion

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Apoapsis - sorry to hear the circumstances of your absence.  Good to have you back.

Can you explain the chart & graphs?  I know Kepler is scanning a hundred thousand stars all at once, and searching for flucuations in luminosity that would indicate a planetary transit in front of its parent star.  How does it work?  
 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 10:58 PM on August 12, 2009 | IP
Apoapsis

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If you think about a planet orbiting a star from our vantage point, the inwards pointing face of the planet will be lit, the outward facing will be dark.  This is known as the phase, as in phase of the moon.  

The curve shows the variation in light as the planet changes phase as well as goes in from and back of the star.  The large dip is the planet going in front of the planet, it is showing it's dark side as well as blocking the star's disk.  As the planet approaches the other side of the planet, it shows more of it's lit face, so the light curve slopes up, then a small dip as the planet is occulted by the star.

According to the article, the effect of the transit of an earth sized planet (big dip in this curve) will be about the same as occultation (small dip).


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 08:06 AM on August 13, 2009 | IP
orion

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Thanks for the explanation.  It boggles my mind that they can make sensors precise and sensitive enough to measure such things.  Amazing!


 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 09:08 AM on August 13, 2009 | IP
Apoapsis

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Systematic noise in the system will make it a pain to use some of the channels.
Noisy Kepler electronics

In recognition of the problem, Kepler prime contractor Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. is contributing “a small portion of our fee to help cover the cost of the added software complexity,” John Troeltzsch, program manager for the Boulder, Colo.-based company, wrote in an e-mail to Space News. NASA and Ball Aerospace officials declined to comment on the amount of money Ball is contributing.

Pretty major screw-up if Ball is offering to help cover the cost.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 6:15 PM on November 6, 2009 | IP
orion

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At least its a fixable problem.  Thanks for the update, Apoapsis.
 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 8:09 PM on November 6, 2009 | IP
Apoapsis

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New article in Science, Kepler has discovered 5 previously unknown planets, all of them short period gas giant types, uninteresting from a astrobiology standpoint, but more data for planetary formation studies.  It will take much longer to find the longer period smaller terrestrial planets.



The Kepler Mission was designed to determine the frequency of Earth-size planets in and near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. The habitable zone is that region where planetary temperatures are suitable for water to exist on the surface. During the first six weeks of observations, 156,000 stars were monitored and five new exoplanets with sizes between 0.37 and 1.6 Jupiter radii and orbital periods from 3.2 to 4.9 days were discovered. The density of the Neptune-size Kepler-4b is similar to Neptune and GJ 436b, even though the irradiation level is 800,000 times higher. Kepler-7b is one of the lowest density planets (~0.17 gr/cc) yet detected. Kepler-5b, 6b, and 8b confirm the existence of planets with densities lower than those predicted for gas giant planets.Kepler Planet-Detection Mission: Introduction and First Results


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 9:16 PM on January 7, 2010 | IP
orion

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Apoapsis - I saw that the other day.  Very cool.  Now to gather data for 3-4 years (hopefully longer) to identify planets in the 'Goldilocks' zone.  Exciting times ahead, for sure.
 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 9:49 PM on January 7, 2010 | IP
Apoapsis

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One year in space, launch date March 6, 2009.

One year anniversary


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 12:20 PM on March 6, 2010 | IP
wisp

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What's the creationist stance on the subject of extraterrestrial life?




I've noticed that they like having the cake and eating it.

They seem to want the best of two worlds.

Here's the contradiction:

* Only a supernatural intelligent agent could have produced us by direct intervention.

* The Universe is finely tuned for life.

The first one seems to make it look difficult. The second one makes it look easy.

They talk about the amazing odds against us having the laws of physics that we 'enjoy' (as if they knew anything about other possibilities).

As if someone was trying to make life happen.

If that was the case, he sucks at it.



-------
Quote from Lester10 at 2:51 PM on September 21, 2010 in the thread
Scientists assert (by Lester):

Ha Ha. (...) I've told you people endlessly about my evidence but you don't want to show me yours - you just assert.
porkchop
Would we see a mammal by the water's edge "suddenly" start breathing underwater(w/camera effect of course)?
Contact me at youdebate.1wr@gishpuppy.com
 


Posts: 3037 | Posted: 1:38 PM on March 6, 2010 | IP
Apoapsis

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Quote from wisp at 1:38 PM on March 6, 2010 :
What's the creationist stance on the subject of extraterrestrial life?




This is probably a close to a position as you will find:

When we start from the Bible, the evidence makes sense. The universe is consistent with the biblical teaching that the earth is a special creation. The magnificent beauty and size of a universe which is apparently devoid of life—except for one little world where life abounds—is exactly what we would expect from a biblical worldview. The truth is not “out there,” the truth is in there—in the Bible! The Lord Jesus is the truth (John 14:6). So when we base our thinking on what God has said in His Word, we find that the universe makes sense.

The Question of Extraterrestrial Life

Plenty of wiggle room for when life is found.

There are some spacecraft on the drawing boards that can analyze the atmospheres of terrestrial planets for oxygen.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 2:28 PM on March 6, 2010 | IP
wisp

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Oh...

So no finely tuned Universe, right?

Looks like we were specially made because we couldn't evolve on our own in this crappy Universe...

At least from that position.



-------
Quote from Lester10 at 2:51 PM on September 21, 2010 in the thread
Scientists assert (by Lester):

Ha Ha. (...) I've told you people endlessly about my evidence but you don't want to show me yours - you just assert.
porkchop
Would we see a mammal by the water's edge "suddenly" start breathing underwater(w/camera effect of course)?
Contact me at youdebate.1wr@gishpuppy.com
 


Posts: 3037 | Posted: 2:58 PM on March 6, 2010 | IP
orion

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Quote from Apoapsis at 2:28 PM on March 6, 2010 :
Quote from wisp at 1:38 PM on March 6, 2010 :
What's the creationist stance on the subject of extraterrestrial life?




This is probably a close to a position as you will find:


When we start from the Bible, the evidence makes sense. The universe is consistent with the biblical teaching that the earth is a special creation. The magnificent beauty and size of a universe which is apparently devoid of life—except for one little world where life abounds—is exactly what we would expect from a biblical worldview. The truth is not “out there,” the truth is in there—in the Bible! The Lord Jesus is the truth (John 14:6). So when we base our thinking on what God has said in His Word, we find that the universe makes sense.

The Question of Extraterrestrial Life

Plenty of wiggle room for when life is found.

There are some spacecraft on the drawing boards that can analyze the atmospheres of terrestrial planets for oxygen.



That statement from AIG is total nonsense.  The writers of the Bible had no clue of the nature and vastness of the universe.  They couldn't have, and passages from the Bible clearly show this lack of understanding.
 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 10:24 AM on March 7, 2010 | IP
wisp

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Unfortunately, many Christians have bought into the idea of extraterrestrial “alien” life without critically assessing such a belief in light of Scripture.
Oh... I see what qualifies as critical thinking to them...

As a plot device, these races allow the exploration of the human condition from the perspective of an outsider. Although very entertaining, such alien races are theologically problematic. Intelligent alien beings cannot be redeemed!
HAHAHAHAHA! I nearly spilled my milk! xD
One might suppose that alien beings have never sinned, in which case they would not need to be redeemed, but then another problem emerges: they suffer the effects of sin, despite having never sinned. Adam’s sin has affected all of creation—not just mankind. Romans 8:20–22 makes it clear that the entirety of creation suffers under the bondage of corruption.
I wonder if sin travels at the speed of light.

Because, if that's the case, some aliens might be still safe.


(Edited by wisp 3/7/2010 at 12:16 PM).


-------
Quote from Lester10 at 2:51 PM on September 21, 2010 in the thread
Scientists assert (by Lester):

Ha Ha. (...) I've told you people endlessly about my evidence but you don't want to show me yours - you just assert.
porkchop
Would we see a mammal by the water's edge "suddenly" start breathing underwater(w/camera effect of course)?
Contact me at youdebate.1wr@gishpuppy.com
 


Posts: 3037 | Posted: 11:17 AM on March 7, 2010 | IP
orion

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Indeed!  'Critical thinking' (as people like Lester  pontificate to) is any assertion and interpretation that supports their literal reading of the Bible - while  ignoring any scientific evidence that contradicts their beliefs.

However, it would be a mistake to say that Creationists follow a strict literal interpretation of the Bible.  They will twist the meaning of scripture if they find that a literal meaning is obviously wrong, and contrary to current knowledge.  The biblical belief in a geocentric universe, is a prime example of this.  But Creationists will try to twist the meanings found in scripture to say that the Bible actually agrees with the modern view of the cosmos when it obviously does no such thing.

Oh, and then there's the naive attempt to point to the words 'behemoth' and 'leviathan' in the book of Jobs as evidence that dinosaurs and people co-existed!  

Propping up the Bible as a valid literal text is like trying to keep a house of cards from blowing over in a wind.  It can't be done.

It's sad to see people trying to make the Bible something that it cannot be in a desperate attempt to prop up their belief in the inerrancy of the Bible.
 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 1:05 PM on March 7, 2010 | IP
wisp

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Yes. Real biblical literalism doesn't exist.

They would need to demonstrate that pi = 3, for instance.

They would believe that you should hate your family and follow Jesus.

They would believe that (oh, my!) they should give their wallet to whomever asked!

That HAS to be metaphor!



-------
Quote from Lester10 at 2:51 PM on September 21, 2010 in the thread
Scientists assert (by Lester):

Ha Ha. (...) I've told you people endlessly about my evidence but you don't want to show me yours - you just assert.
porkchop
Would we see a mammal by the water's edge "suddenly" start breathing underwater(w/camera effect of course)?
Contact me at youdebate.1wr@gishpuppy.com
 


Posts: 3037 | Posted: 3:06 PM on March 7, 2010 | IP
Apoapsis

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The First Kepler Science Conference

Announcing: The First Kepler Science Conference

Dates:
December 5-6-7, 2011 (to be followed by a Kepler Science
Team meeting at the same venue on December 8-9, 2011)

Topic:
All Kepler Mission science results, from exoplanet transits and the frequency of Earth-like worlds to asteroseismology

Participants:
All interested scientists and journalists are welcome

Location:
NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California in
the Building 3 Conference Center (outside the Center gates)


Too bad the really interesting data from this takes so long to collect.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 11:34 PM on June 12, 2010 | IP
orion

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All 5 planets discovered so far are hot gas giants orbiting close to their parent stars.  That makes sense.  planets farther out take longer to complete their orbits, and I think they need more than one transit to confirm/solidify the data.

I look forward to hearing the results.
 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 01:21 AM on June 13, 2010 | IP
Fencer27

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Quote from wisp at 3:06 PM on March 7, 2010 :
Yes. Real biblical literalism doesn't exist.


I disagree. I agree with this guy. He defines a biblical literalist as someone who takes everything that could be taken literally as literal. In the video he gives the example of the obvious metaphor of "Jesus as the lamb". Saying that you can't really take it literally to believe that Jesus was a physical lamb, or "Marry had a little lamb" as he put it. So you can be a literalist and still recognize that there are metaphorical passages.

Although, for me anyway, deciding what constitutes as a passage that could be taken literally could become problematic. What parameters would or could you use to determine if a passage can be taken literally; does the poetry and writing style of Genesis with the culture surrounding its creation make it only palatable as a metaphor, making it analogous with calling Jesus a lamb(?).

That aside, I do think that he does a great job at explaining that a literalist can interpret the Bible with non-literal language when no other viable option is available, and the kinds of dangers you can get from fundamentalism.


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"So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets." - Jesus (Matthew 7:12)
 


Posts: 551 | Posted: 01:58 AM on June 13, 2010 | IP
wisp

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Replied.

http://www.youdebate.com/cgi-bin/scarecrow/topic.cgi?forum=3&topic=74352


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Quote from Lester10 at 2:51 PM on September 21, 2010 in the thread
Scientists assert (by Lester):

Ha Ha. (...) I've told you people endlessly about my evidence but you don't want to show me yours - you just assert.
porkchop
Would we see a mammal by the water's edge "suddenly" start breathing underwater(w/camera effect of course)?
Contact me at youdebate.1wr@gishpuppy.com
 


Posts: 3037 | Posted: 1:31 PM on June 13, 2010 | IP
Apoapsis

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Pretty significant breach of protocol, an unofficial announcement of Kepler results shows a lot of earth-like planets.



Galaxy is rich in earth-like planets

(Edited by Apoapsis 7/27/2010 at 5:06 PM).


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Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 5:05 PM on July 27, 2010 | IP
wisp

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We sill one day venture to the stars...


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Quote from Lester10 at 2:51 PM on September 21, 2010 in the thread
Scientists assert (by Lester):

Ha Ha. (...) I've told you people endlessly about my evidence but you don't want to show me yours - you just assert.
porkchop
Would we see a mammal by the water's edge "suddenly" start breathing underwater(w/camera effect of course)?
Contact me at youdebate.1wr@gishpuppy.com
 


Posts: 3037 | Posted: 5:54 PM on July 27, 2010 | IP
Apoapsis

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Quote from wisp at 5:54 PM on July 27, 2010 :
We sill one day venture to the stars...



It's pretty interesting to look at the size distribution relative to our solar system.  We have four terrestrial planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars), two Neptune type planets (Neptune, Uranus), one Saturn, one Jupiter.

The similarity to the distribution found so far is striking.

In all likelihood, the long delayed space interferometry mission that can spectroscopically analyze the atmospheres of these new found earthlike planets for signs of life will get a lot more attention.


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Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 9:48 PM on July 27, 2010 | IP
orion

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Ha!  It makes perfectly good sense that there would be many earth-size planets.  It just amazes me that we now have the technology to identify where they are.

It seems like the technology and procedural techniques in identifying exoplanets is expanding my leaps and bounds.  


Apoapsis:
In all likelihood, the long delayed space interferometry mission that can spectroscopically analyze the atmospheres of these new found earthlike planets for signs of life will get a lot more attention.


It is all a matter of time before we find signs of life on another planet.  I hope it happens in our life-time.  Oxygen in a planet's atmosphere would be a very compelling biomarker.  Shoot, we still need to find out what the source of methane is on Mars.  That's something to pursue in our very own solar system.

Wouldn't Carl Sagan be thrilled at what is happening now.
 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 12:26 AM on July 28, 2010 | IP
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Indeed. That's why i quoted him.

I distinctly remember that phrase because of a weirdly emotive and strange tribute, which i came to like very much:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSgiXGELjbc



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Quote from Lester10 at 2:51 PM on September 21, 2010 in the thread
Scientists assert (by Lester):

Ha Ha. (...) I've told you people endlessly about my evidence but you don't want to show me yours - you just assert.
porkchop
Would we see a mammal by the water's edge "suddenly" start breathing underwater(w/camera effect of course)?
Contact me at youdebate.1wr@gishpuppy.com
 


Posts: 3037 | Posted: 01:10 AM on July 28, 2010 | IP
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The big close-in planets are the easiest to find.

NASA's Kepler Mission Discovers Two Planets Transiting the Same Star


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Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 02:17 AM on September 18, 2010 | IP
orion

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Apoapsis - What do you think of the GMT (Giant Magellan Telescope) currently under construction.  Wow!  What a tremendous telescope this will be!  

Giant Magellan Telescope

Here is an artist depiction of the observatory, which is to be built in Cerro Las Campanas, Chile.



The GMT is poised to address some of the most fundamental and outstanding questions in astronomy: the nature of the mysterious dark matter and dark energy, the origin of the first stars and first galaxies, and how stars, galaxies and black holes evolve over time. One of the particular strengths of the GMT will be its ability to image planets around nearby stars and to search for signs of life in their atmospheres


Awesome!  Very exciting times we're living in.
 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 3:20 PM on October 8, 2010 | IP
Apoapsis

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It's a problem of scaling.  Ground observations can typically be made for maybe a few percent of an orbital mission.  But for ten times the cost of a ground telescope, we can make a hundred or a thousand times more measurements with much better accuracy and precision.

A ground telescope will probably make the first detection of oxygen on another extrasolar planet, because of the timing.  An orbital mission such as TPF might find a thousand of them, but not first. . .

(Edited by Apoapsis 10/10/2010 at 12:35 AM).


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Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 12:33 AM on October 10, 2010 | IP
Apoapsis

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Safing event.  Seems like more than the usual number of spacecraft have gone into safing lately.

Kepler safing


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Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 11:19 PM on December 26, 2010 | IP
Apoapsis

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Not habitable, but an indication that the next 700 planets Kepler is observing might have good candidates for life.

Smallest extra-solar planet discovered




-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 4:14 PM on January 10, 2011 | IP
Galileo

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Hang on, are they saying it orbits it's star once every 0.8 days? Isn't that really fast? I haven't done the maths.


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Hallowed are the Invisible Pink Unicorns
 


Posts: 160 | Posted: 03:15 AM on January 11, 2011 | IP
Apoapsis

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Really fast, and really hot.

This is the type of planet that is easier to find, you don't have to wait long for a repeating signal.  A planet at earth's orbital distance would only occult the star once per year.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 12:12 PM on January 11, 2011 | IP
orion

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Let's see...

If Mercury's mean distance from the sun is 36 million miles, and this planet is 20 times closer to it's parent star...

Planet X distance = 1.8 million miles from it's sun.

Orbital period = 0.84 days = 24hr * .84 = 20.2 hours

Doing the math...

Velocity = 560,000 miles/hr

In comparison, earth's mean velocity around the sun is about 67,000 miles/hr.

It'll be really exciting to see what discoveries will be announced in coming years.

(Edited by orion 1/11/2011 at 4:19 PM).
 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 12:49 PM on January 11, 2011 | IP
Apoapsis

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I recall on another board perhaps 20 years ago, one of the participants stating that if a planet was found around another star, it would disprove the Bible and he would cease to be a Christian.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 4:09 PM on January 11, 2011 | IP
orion

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Quote from Apoapsis at 3:09 PM on January 11, 2011 :
I recall on another board perhaps 20 years ago, one of the participants stating that if a planet was found around another star, it would disprove the Bible and he would cease to be a Christian.


LOL!

It shouldn't be surprising, as the Bible's depiction of the universe is limited to what the writers knew at the time.  There is no divine revelation about the universe written in scripture.

It goes to show how strong an influence religion tradition has on people.  Even though a literal interpetation of the Bible is proven wrong in numerous cases, many people continue to hold on to the old fallacious notions, rejecting the plain facts that science presents to them.  

Amazing, and sad.



 


Posts: 1460 | Posted: 4:29 PM on January 11, 2011 | IP
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New press release:

Kepler finds 54 planet candidates in habitable zone



"We went from zero to 68 Earth-sized planet candidates and zero to 54 candidates in the habitable zone - a region where liquid water could exist on a planet’s surface. Some candidates could even have moons with liquid water," said William Borucki of NASA’s Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., and the Kepler Mission’s science principal investigator. "Five of the planetary candidates are both near Earth-size and orbit in the habitable zone of their parent stars."


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Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 4:49 PM on February 2, 2011 | IP
    
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