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orion

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Excellent!  Of those 54 in the habitable zone, 5 are earth-size.  


 


Posts: 1459 | Posted: 6:57 PM on February 2, 2011 | IP
Apoapsis

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Now to look for free oxygen in their atmospheres.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 02:25 AM on February 3, 2011 | IP
orion

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Now to look for free oxygen in their atmospheres.


Yes, free atmospheric oxygen would be compelling evidence for life elsewhere.
 


Posts: 1459 | Posted: 07:04 AM on February 3, 2011 | IP
Apoapsis

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Habitable zone planet.  A little heavy, but intriguing.



Kepler-22b

(Edited by Apoapsis 12/5/2011 at 3:18 PM).


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 3:14 PM on December 5, 2011 | IP
Fencer27

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Thanks for the update Apoapsis!

I can't wait to see what else they find out about this Kepler-22b!


-------
"So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets." - Jesus (Matthew 7:12)
 


Posts: 551 | Posted: 6:36 PM on December 6, 2011 | IP
Apoapsis

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They need more time to meet mission objectives, they are behind because of noise in the system (go look at my post from Nov. 9 2009).

A major black eye for Ball.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 10:57 PM on December 7, 2011 | IP
Apoapsis

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Mission extended through 2016.

http://www.avionics-intelligence.com/articles/2012/04/nasa-extends-kepler.html

I'll admit to being lukewarm on this if the extension means delaying other programs that would provide higher quality information.  On the other hand, I wouldn't think the operations budget would be too high for this, and the extension means that they get a lot more chances to find smaller planets with long (~1 year!) orbits.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 06:33 AM on April 11, 2012 | IP
orion

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Apoapsis - I agree with you, extending the mission is relatively cheap.  Now that the Shuttle is history, I wonder what direction NASA is taking.  I know the Obama administration scrapped the Moon, and is instead supporting developing new launch technology, something I think is a good idea.  But I haven't heard a lot about what science missions are on the board - except for WST and Mars.
 


Posts: 1459 | Posted: 08:54 AM on April 13, 2012 | IP
Apoapsis

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That's the problem, science missions are being gutted to pay for new manned launch vehicles.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 1:21 PM on April 16, 2012 | IP
orion

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That's the problem, science missions are being gutted to pay for new manned launch vehicles.


When I was younger I used to be a big supporter of manned space flight.  In recent years that passion has cooled a bit.  For instance, even though I hate to say it, I don't think the ISS was hardly worth the cost.  It has served mainly as a platform to study the effects of moderate duration human space flight, not much else.  It was more of an excuse to have a Shuttle program.  Today, given the economical reality of shrinking government budgets, I would like to see more emphasis given to unmanned science missions.  However, I don't see that happening any time soon.  
 


Posts: 1459 | Posted: 2:20 PM on April 16, 2012 | IP
Apoapsis

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ISS could have been a good platform for in-orbit assembly of vehicles for transfer to other bodies in the solar system, but that requires an essentially equatorial orbit.  Instead, politically to get the Russians on board to help service it, they put it in a high-inclination orbit that makes it equally reachable from both Baikonur and Kennedy, but makes it worthless for about anything but going up to sit there.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 06:25 AM on April 17, 2012 | IP
Apoapsis

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NASA's Kepler Discovers 461 New Planet Candidates



Exoplanet archive

About twenty years ago, I ran across a creationist on another forum who declared that he would abandon Christianity if it were ever proven that there was a planet around another star, because that would be unequivocal evidence that the Bible was not true.

He has since purchased a mail-order PhD, and continues to pontificate on another forum.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 10:03 PM on January 7, 2013 | IP
orion

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Yep, planets all over the place!  I saw an article a few days ago by some Cal Tech researchers estimating (conservativly) that our Milky Way galaxy alone contains at least 100 billion planets.  Multiply that by the billions of galaxies in the universe... That's a huge number of planets.

And you got to wonder about moons that orbit those planets.

Given that biomolecules (amino acids, sugars, nucleotide bases, lipids, etc) appear to be somewhat abundant in space, I would say that life is out there in abundance.  We are not alone - IMO.
 


Posts: 1459 | Posted: 10:27 PM on January 7, 2013 | IP
Apoapsis

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Safe mode due to worn out reaction wheel.

Sticky Wheel Forces Kepler Mission Safe Mode

Reaction wheels are typically flown in sets of four, with any three being capable of doing the job.  One has already failed, so we are likely getting close to end of mission.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 2:27 PM on January 23, 2013 | IP
orion

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Oh great!  I sure hope the wheel returns to normal functionality.  It would be nice to get a few more years out of Kepler.
 


Posts: 1459 | Posted: 2:40 PM on January 23, 2013 | IP
Apoapsis

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Quote from orion at 2:40 PM on January 23, 2013 :
Oh great!  I sure hope the wheel returns to normal functionality.  It would be nice to get a few more years out of Kepler.


Well, the good news would be that Terrestrial Planet Finder will never get off the drawing boards while Kepler is operating.





-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 09:10 AM on January 24, 2013 | IP
Apoapsis

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Out of safe mode, but not out of the woods.

I've never been on a mission with reaction wheels where they weren't a major pain.

Kepler Mission Manager Update: Kepler Returns to Science Mode


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 08:23 AM on January 30, 2013 | IP
Apoapsis

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Measuring relativistic effects with Kepler:

Gravity-Bending Find Leads to Kepler Meeting Einstein

Cast comes off next week and the doctor may possibly allow me to bend enough to sit in a computer chair for more than 2 minutes!


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 06:55 AM on April 5, 2013 | IP
orion

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Interesting article, Apoapsis.

It'll be good to have you back on the board.  What bone did you break?  
 


Posts: 1459 | Posted: 10:39 AM on April 6, 2013 | IP
Apoapsis

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Quote from Apoapsis at 2:27 PM on January 23, 2013 :
Safe mode due to worn out reaction wheel.

Sticky Wheel Forces Kepler Mission Safe Mode

Reaction wheels are typically flown in sets of four, with any three being capable of doing the job.  One has already failed, so we are likely getting close to end of mission.


Looks like my prediction is coming true.


NASA's Planet-Hunting Kepler Spacecraft Faces Serious Health Problems


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 06:51 AM on May 2, 2013 | IP
Briscoe Darling

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Do you folks honestly expect to find life on one of these planets?
 


Posts: 116 | Posted: 2:43 PM on May 4, 2013 | IP
orion

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Apoapsis:
Looks like my prediction is coming true.


I hate it when you're right about these things!  Hope the mission can continue for a while longer.
 


Posts: 1459 | Posted: 08:02 AM on May 7, 2013 | IP
Apoapsis

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Quote from Briscoe Darling at 2:43 PM on May 4, 2013 :
Do you folks honestly expect to find life on one of these planets?



Yes.


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 09:33 AM on May 13, 2013 | IP
orion

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Quote from Apoapsis at 09:33 AM on May 13, 2013 :
Quote from Briscoe Darling at 2:43 PM on May 4, 2013 :
Do you folks honestly expect to find life on one of these planets?



Yes.


Amazingly, technology is progressing to the point where the composition of atmospheres of larger exoplanets can be determined.  Analyzing the makeup of smaller earth-size planets is not yet feasible, but with advancing technology and technique it will be in the future.  The ability to detect planets that harbor life is not in the realm of science fiction any more.

Sifting through atmospheres of far-off worlds
 


Posts: 1459 | Posted: 3:50 PM on May 13, 2013 | IP
ANorveyanFellow

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Ohhhh this is fun. Hope we actually find an earth-like planet with lifeforms on it. That would be most, most fun. Now NASA just needs to get cracking on that warp-drive of theirs.

As a Creationist, I think the possibility of ET life is completely possible, and I honestly hope we find something squirming around out there. Now, I currently don't believe there will be intelligent life, but the Bible never flatly says there isn't intelligent ET life out there. Sensible, because that sort of information is interesting, but irrelevant. If there is intelligent ET life out there, well then that would be very interesting, very interesting to see how that would work into Gods plan. Would they be humanoid? We are apparently 'Made in Gods image' but I can't imagine an infinite all-powerful all-transcendent being having a physical form necessarily, so potential alien intelligent life could have a broad span of physical appearances.

All very interesting stuff, all of which will be key in my questions when I arrive in Heaven. Most fascinating stuff indeed.

On a related side-note, what is the thought of you people on NASA's attempt to build a warp drive?
 


Posts: 6 | Posted: 6:36 PM on June 4, 2013 | IP
orion

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ANorveyanFellow - welcome to the forum.

I'm glad to see a creationist take interest in the possibility of ET life.  I agree with you that it's a very exciting and interesting endeavor to seek out possible life on other worlds.  

Personally, I'm sure there is other intelligent life out there somewhere.  But intelligent civilizations are separated by enormous distances, and by time.  It's exciting that we live during a time when we have the potential of discovering such civilizations.

As for warp drive - what do you mean by warp drive?  Faster than light travel?  That technology is  far beyond our capability today, if it is possible at all.  Interstellar travel presents enormous obstacles for human space travelers.  I'm not saying its impossible, but the challenges are daunting.  Our machines will precede us.  
 


Posts: 1459 | Posted: 10:10 PM on June 4, 2013 | IP
ANorveyanFellow

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Yes, thank you for the welcome. I've been on this board before, and seen several unsavoury types in both creationist and evolutionist flavours, so its nice to see some proper fellows who aren't automatically caustic towards creationists by default. Well met.

Oh, have you not heard?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/14/warp-drive-possible-star-trek-special-relativity_n_3273422.html

They had a very, very fascinating article on it in Popular Science. From what I can deduce, it seems that a warp drive is quite mathematically possible-ish, but there are some significant physics problems to overcome. Still, it does seem that NASA is funding research into the matter.

(Edited by ANorveyanFellow 6/5/2013 at 09:24 AM).
 


Posts: 6 | Posted: 09:22 AM on June 5, 2013 | IP
orion

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Interesting article.  I have to admit, I don't understand it - I'm not a physicist.  But I'm glad someone is doing some initial research into it.  
 


Posts: 1459 | Posted: 12:46 PM on June 5, 2013 | IP
ANorveyanFellow

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Well if I live to see the first manned warp-ship to Alpha Centauri, I will definitely die happy.

Also, does anything happen in this forum? Seems like rather a dead place.

(Edited by ANorveyanFellow 6/5/2013 at 2:39 PM).
 


Posts: 6 | Posted: 2:39 PM on June 5, 2013 | IP
orion

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Well if I live to see the first manned warp-ship to Alpha Centauri, I will definitely die happy.


Me too!  But I wouldn't count on it happening any time soon, if ever.


Also, does anything happen in this forum? Seems like rather a dead place.

Yep, not much activity here.  You might try beaming down to another forum.  If you find a good one, let me know.  :0)
 


Posts: 1459 | Posted: 10:16 PM on June 6, 2013 | IP
ANorveyanFellow

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I actually, I believe I just did find a new one. Right at the top of this Forum XD.

http://www.4forums.com/political/forum.php
 


Posts: 6 | Posted: 11:09 AM on June 7, 2013 | IP
Apoapsis

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Kepler adds 715 to the list of confirmed planets, and apparently they are only about half way through their data set.
SpaceRef Kepler article


-------
Pogge:” This is the volume of a sphere with a 62 kilometer (about 39 miles) radius, which is considerably smaller than the 2,000 mile radius of the Earth.”
Wikipedia:” For Earth, the mean radius is 6,371.009 km(≈3,958.761 mi; ≈3,440.069 nmi).”
Wisp to Lester (on Pogge): Do you admit he was wrong about the basics?
Lester: No

 


Posts: 1747 | Posted: 07:59 AM on February 27, 2014 | IP
    
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